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behavior, Words

Five Senses, Why We Need Them

I love the smell of lilacs in the afternoon.

I love the taste of hot fudge on vanilla ice cream.

I love the feel of freshly landered sheets.

I love the sound of my grandaughter’s laughter.

I love the sight of a sunrise after an overnight thunderstorm.

Our senses are the way we experience the world. They are essential for making sense of our surroundings. We sense a change in our life when something is not going the same way it was yesterday.

The word “sense” has many meanings, and there are many ways of using it. The definition depends on what is said.

(from dictionary.com)

1. any of the faculties, as sight, hearing, smell, taste, or touch, by which humans and animals perceive stimuli originating from outside or inside the body.
2. these faculties collectively.
3. their operation or function; sensation.
4. a feeling or perception produced through the organs of touch, taste, etc., or resulting from a particular condition of some part of the body: to have a sense of cold.
5. a faculty or function of the mind analogous to sensation: the moral sense.
What would happen if you lost one of your senses? If you have all of them now, this may be hard to imagine. If you have lost one or more, you may already know how to compensate.
I find it hard to decide which sense would be the most difficult to live without. Sight, of course, is crucial to my job. Taste and smell  I think would be easier to loose than the others. Being 60 years old, I already have lost these to a degree. Touch would be sad because I have small grandchildren (one an infant) that I love to cuddle with. And hearing would devastate me because I love music.
Let’s celebrate the fact that we can sense things in our world.
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About ejgresearch

I was that kid who loved phonics. Words became my hobby, reading and writing, and now they are my profession. I do research and content writing. If you love words as much as I do. I think you'll enjoy this blog. I'll be exploring the origins and current interpretations of words. One post at a time.

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